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Massey Discussion Forums :: Massey Talk :: Family tractors etc. View modes: 
User avatar
Posted: 3/31/2013 4:36:44 PM
   

RE:Family tractors etc.

Bob,
 
Another great story, photos, and tribute to your Dad.  I'm thinking maybe you should do a book on the Lynn family history and their tractors.

Thanks again for shaing with us.

        John B.







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User avatar
Posted: 3/31/2013 6:41:50 PM
   

RE:Family tractors etc.

Bob,

I agree with John - what a great story!!

Thank you for sharing and what a motivational story to get yourself fired up again it finish that 33 story.  I know your Dad is watching and just waiting for you and your son to get it running again.  A

nd yes, it would be a tribute to a good family and a love to the Massey tractor.

Thank you!!


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User avatar
Posted: 4/1/2013 1:02:55 AM
   

RE:Family tractors etc.

Bob,  Another super story!  I just hope it will encourage others to come forward with theirs.  We do seem to be on a roll on this site at the moment with more new threads and contributors - all very encouraging!

John


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User avatar
Posted: 4/8/2013 6:51:13 PM
   

RE:Family tractors etc.

Grandpa’s 44 SN 44GR19646

 

I didn’t know until just a few years ago that Dad and Grandpa had owned a 44 before this one. They bought it at a farm auction down in Missouri when they started farming the entire home place. As I recall Dad explaining it was an older model and was well worn or possibly didn’t have hydraulics or maybe both and they traded it for a newer used model at Glenwood Farm Equipment in Glenwood, IA. I’m guessing this was about 1955 and although they owned it in partnership it the 44 was always considered to be Grandpa’s.

 

Grandpa’s 44 was the main workhorse for several years and carried the cornpicker for nearly 20 years. It wore out 2 Massey pickers and carried a New Idea Superpicker for a few years. In about 1967 a sheller attachment was added and was found to be too much of a load for the old 260-cid engine. The crank was getting flat so Dad purchased a used and abused and slightly burnt 44 with a better motor from a neighbor. That motor was rebuilt and we put it in the old 44. That was my first exposure to an engine removal and installation process. It was performed in the driveway where we had room to use the 33 and loader to lift the engines. It must have gone pretty well because I remember Dad bragging about not breaking any of the mounting tabs or ears on the clutch housings!

 

In early retirement it was bolted to an IHC pitmanless mower most all summer long. When loader tractor responsibilities were moved to it, we widened the rear rims 2 inches to accept the old used 15.5 tires off the MF180s. This was cheaper than buying new 13.6 tires for it. It has been under the loader 30 years and has a few battle scars from some of the many normal and unusual tasks that a loader tractor gets pulled into.

 

The 44 was the first tractor I drove without someone right beside me. I was 6 or 7 and “drove” pulling a two-wheeled flatbed trailer while Grandpa and a neighbor boy picked up little round hay bales. I basically just steered and Grandpa would just walk up the tongue when I needed help. Looking back this seems extremely dangerous but it was a time when we rode in convertibles without any seat restraints and on bikes and motorcycles without helmets. We drank milk that was hand squeezed into an open bucket under an unwashed cow with flies on her back and water out of field tile outlets on hot summer days. Tractors didn’t have ROPS cabs, seat belts or buddy seats.

 

Pictures below include the 44:

  • 1. Lined up with the 444, 33 and 30.
  • 2. With the MH picker, Grandpa driving and Dad’s Heider wagon.
  • 3. Moving an old government bin.
  • 4. Later in life with the loader.

 

 

I have a magazine ad touting the ease and speed of putting the MH picker on. It says and I’m quoting “Quick attachment – One man, one hour”. I’m sure they were referring to mounting the picker after the tractor was prepped. But as I recall getting the 44 ready was quite an undertaking. Dad and Grandpa switched the rear wheels to get the dishes reversed. Took the tricycle front off and installed the single front. You could pick with the tricycle but you had to raise the picker clear up to turn sharp enough at the ends. They put the modified JD super snoot on to facilitate a continuos supply of cool air for the 44. The undercarriage or sub frame was mounted and drive chains attached. Finally the side panels were put on the engine compartment and a collar was put between the muffler and hood to keep silks, husks and leaves off the manifold.

 

Asbestos was used under this metal collar to complete the seal and protect both the hood and muffler. Yes asbestos, my how times have changed. All this sounds like a lot of extra work but they never had a fire and never experienced an overheating problem regardless of the crop conditions. And fortunately no one was ever diagnosed with lung cancer!

 

I have no way of estimating how many hours the 44 has been used but the coating on the steering wheel is so worn that the seam where the ring was welded together sticks well through the covering. Maybe some of your tractors have this same issue.

 

More Later,

Bob

 



Post attachments:
4-by-the-pump.JPGPicker.jpgMoving-bins.JPG2003.jpg

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User avatar
Posted: 4/9/2013 6:01:55 PM
   

RE:Family tractors etc.

Another great story and more great photos.   Thanks again Bob!

    JB



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User avatar
Posted: 4/9/2013 7:56:44 PM
   

RE:Family tractors etc.

Thanks for another great story, Bob!!  Your family tractor history needs to be put in a book. Especially since you have the nice pics to help document everything!!  I might have to find me a mounted corn picker so it can pull my Heider wagon!!

Thanks for sharing!

GTE



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