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Massey Discussion Forums :: Massey Talk :: Wooden Thresher View modes: 
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Posted: 6/19/2012 1:12:02 PM
   

Wooden Thresher

Back on the old site, I believe there was a thread on a wooden Wallis thresher,sorry to say this is not about a Wallis but a Aultman-Taylor that our local club has, anyway what was used to retreat the wood and not hurt the graphics? linseed oil was part of the mix. Thanks Billy


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Posted: 6/19/2012 1:49:11 PM
   

RE:Wooden Thresher

Hi Billy, The Wallis Threshing Machine is mine. there is no linseed oil in what I used and actually was told not to use it as it gets dry and cracks off. I used 50/50 mix of Diesel and Hydraulic fluid. still looks good and it is three years later. 

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Posted: 6/19/2012 2:37:35 PM
   

RE:Wooden Thresher

Well! that proves my memory stinks, Thank you!  makes perfect sense.


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Posted: 6/19/2012 7:41:56 PM
   

RE:Wooden Thresher

Hi Bill,

I too would advise you NOT to use linseed oil.  The Purdue Ag Alumni have a very old McCormick reaper and used linssed oil on it several years ago and it is totally black today with not one letter, number or decal visible anywhere. The diesel / hydraulic fluid has worked for most everything I have used it on.  I have also used WD-40 by the gallon but it does not last as long. 

Just my opinion!!

GTE


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Posted: 6/20/2012 1:32:21 AM
   

RE:Wooden Thresher

Great to see the "UK Patents Pending Preservation Mix" being accepted and used in the USA, we have been using it now for many years with great results as you have described on both wood and metal. 

If you do use linseed oil on wood, I have found it is better to use the "raw" not "boiled" linseed oil and thin it at least 50% with diesel (which also helps if there is any woodworm to control), otherwise it goes very dark and sticky as Gary described, eventually over years it will dry but then can result in cracking and peeling in sunlight. 
The other problem with using just linseed oil on wood in damp atmosphere's or winters like we have here in UK you get a fungous mold grow on the wood, when dry in the spring this just wipes off or goes with another spray of our diesel / oil mix.

Malcolm.




  


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