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johnfarnworth - (2/28/2013 3:51:06 AM)
RE:Family tractors remembered - gone but not forgoten
Here is a pic of my Dad's MF 165 diesel.  It is in fact parked in my uncle's farm yard which was next door to ours.  It is seen with the crop sprayer mounted on it.  Also it can be seen that it is fitted with rowcrop narrow rear wheels - probably made by Standens.  This tractor seemed to spend most of its life hitched to the sprayer for use on acres and acres of barley, wheat, potatoes, cabbage and cauliflowers.  It was sold off at their retirement sale and I don't know where it is now.  The tractor was the first type of 165 over here and fitted with the Perkins A203 diesel.  Later ones had the slightly more powerful A212.

The double sliding doors to the right of the tractor are of interest.  In there my Gradad had an MH hammer mill for grinding barley for the livestock.  The doors would be opened and the MH 12-20 tractor parked at right angles to where the 165 is and a flat belt connected to the pulley to drive the mill.  Later the work was taken over by a Fordson Major E27N paraffin tractor.  A great sight and noise to hear the tractors working at constant load on the belt - different to them working in the field where the load, hence sound, varies with the load as the governor cuts in and out.

The other shots which I have dug out show me unloading the MF 780 Special combien which I have mentioned before under the M62 (now M60) motorway which crossed our farm.  The tractor hitched to the trailer is a Forsdson Major.

 Also another shot of Dad and uncle's retirement sale with one of the MF 35s in the foreground and the last combine we had - a Laverda  - in the background.  The final shot is from the seat of one of our MF 35s driving along the side of the Manchester Ship Canal towrds the high level bridge but on the opposite side to where I was unloading the combine.

John.