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Massey Discussion Forums :: Massey Talk :: Massey 81s and 82s View modes: 
User avatar
Posted: 12/2/2018 4:18:42 PM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

Mike,

I have a friend that flies a small plane and has said that 100 octane fuel is fun to burn! He always uses it the first time he starts and engine after an overhaul. I need to try to some time.

Good eye on the grill and 10X 34 tires, did look like a 22 after I looked at the picture.



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User avatar
Posted: 12/2/2018 10:29:40 PM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

John & Others,

I got an email from Bill Weber tonight and maybe this will clear up some of your mystery or maybe even confuse you more?? I copied and pasted his note below.

Joe


I was looking through the MCA web site and came across the 81 and 82
thread....   here is the answer everyone is looking for ..
 
 
in 1941  Massey made 19 of the 81 standard tug   it had 32 inch rear rubber
and Massey cast front wheels similar to the B Allis Chalmers.   it was
painted royal blue, same as all domestic RCAF airplanes and vehicles
 
the 82 was a 1942 and was painted RCAF green due to the fact that in 42 the
Ministry ordered a paint change for vehicles and planes.   It had 32"
rubber, the exhaust hole in the hood was indented but not punched . down exhaust and a short air cleaner.  it was also fitted with a gasoline engine and no spare tank as in the kerosene model 82 as  the civilian version was.
 
They also produced a 101 in 41 that was blue.. it had down exhaust , rear tail light, different draw bar, indented  but not punched exhaust hole.
 
The paint codes are the same as the Air plane restorers use.
 
 
in 45   any airfield service vehicles were painted  yellow  as WW2 was
winding down.
 
hope this helps
Bill
 
WILLIAM WEBER  
 












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User avatar
Posted: 12/3/2018 4:17:35 AM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

Joe,

Thanks for forwarding William's comments and a big thanks to William to advancing our knowledge and taking the troble to respond.

Now we need someone to come up with the numbers produced - this information must be out there???

John


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User avatar
Posted: 12/3/2018 4:37:34 PM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

   Thanks to all for the interesting information shared. I'm thinking that many of the Massey 81s and 82s were deployed with the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan that was established in December of 1939 to supply air crews for Commonwealth countries. These being Britian, Australia, New Zealand and Canada. Other military servicemen from other Commonwealth countries were trained and served with the RAF. This program produced about 131,000 pilots and aircrew for the Allied forces in Europe and later in the Pacific. As far as I can figure approximately 9,000 Americans crossed the border and joined the RCAF and took part in the program. A number of them were later repatriated to the USAF when  the US entered the war in December of 1941.
    This program resulted in the use of 24 existing airfields and another 80 being built plus alternate emergency fields across Canada. I'm thinking that this number of airfields alone would have created a demand for airport tugs.
   During WW2 my father, father in law and 3 uncles all served with the RCAF. Five of them servered with the the BCATP across the prairies. My regret is that I didn't ask more questions when they were still with us as I'm sure these tractors were very familiar to them.
    I was wondering what make of tractors were used in Britan as tugs during the war? Also, did the RCAF use other tractor manufacturers.
    I trust this helps to fill in some of the background on this topic.     
           Doug



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User avatar
Posted: 12/4/2018 4:03:54 AM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

Doug,

Thanks for that interesting background information

RCAF planes and personnel were based in the UK but I'm not certain if they brought their own 81/82 tugs with them.

Perhaps the most common British built tractor tug was the David Brown based on the agricultural "DB Cropmaster".  This was a sturdy machine with push/pull and tow equipment and heavily boxed inwheels and rivers position.  There are still a good few around and are much sought after by collectors.

John


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User avatar
Posted: 12/4/2018 10:42:41 AM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

John,

Here are some of the RCAF pictures I have collected over the years.  

YUMA 81 note cast front wheels
YUMA 82 - pressed front wheels
YUMA 101 RCAF which Bill Weber mentioned via his email

Same 82 as it now sits in UK with new owner
Random 81 RCAF found on internet somewhere
Blue 81 Mike P was referring to which now resides in S. Dakota

Post attachments:
IMG_0164.jpgDSCN0397.jpgDSCN0444.jpgDSCN0442.jpgRCAF-82-Norwich-2012-021.jpg101-MH-RCAF.jpgMH_81.jpgRCAF-81.jpgRCAF-81b.jpgRCAF-81f.jpg

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User avatar
Posted: 12/4/2018 11:49:10 AM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

Malcolm what identifies the 102 as being RCAF?

John


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User avatar
Posted: 12/4/2018 12:38:38 PM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

According to Bill Weber, the key features of the 101 military were down exhaust , a rear taillight, and different drawbar.  He said it was originally painted blue.

Drew


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User avatar
Posted: 12/4/2018 12:44:03 PM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

The blue 20 Standard that is stenciled A-Tharaska Air has 28 inch rear tires, pressed steel front rims and exhaust through the hood that didn't appear to have been modified.


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User avatar
Posted: 12/4/2018 9:28:42 PM
   

RE:Massey 81s and 82s

John & others,

Here are some more WW2 pictures Bill sent me for your viewing pleasure. Notice the down under exhaust on the two dozen 101s. The last one looks like it had been Bombed??

Joe


courtesy of the Australia national archives
 
WILLIAM WEBER
 


Post attachments:
AA012991.jpgAA012997.jpgAA013019.jpgAA013027.jpg

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