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Massey Discussion Forums :: Massey Talk :: Winterising View modes: 
User avatar
Posted: 10/1/2019 6:12:43 AM
   

Winterising

So - it's that time of the year - winter approaching.

I wonder what you all do to "winterise" your tractors to protect them over the winter.  I am on with my schedule now which comprises:

1. Spray with a fine mist of oil.  We have a damp and humid climate so rust is an ever present threat which paint does not protect from unless they are strored in heated/dehumidified sheds - expensive!
2. Check anti freeze in radiators or drain water.  Some people are dead agaist having antifreeze in the water system - any views??
3. Check tyres - it's amazing how much pressure can be lost whilst standing.  I always inflate mine to about 30% above recommended pressure and that way they last longer
4.  Magnetos - I'd be interested to know how you folks protect them over winter.  Again our damp and humid climate is not favourable to them standing for long periods.

Your comments invited.
John


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User avatar
Posted: 10/1/2019 9:09:09 AM
   

RE:Winterising

Hi John et al.
                    All my tractors are filled with anti-freeze because A/F contains some anti- corrosion compotent and it prevents oxygen, itself an agent for rusting, from attacking the vulnerable bits. it goes without saying that dripping pump seals don't allow this practice.  As for mags. I just cover them up with a small rag and give the engine one pull-up every month or six weeks, this spreads the oil back up the bores without scraping it off altogether and excercises the impulse and points, it also eases the valve springs. American Boche mags are good in this respect.
  As for the rest of the tractor I spray it all over with a mixture of Diesel and new engine oil with one of those plastic spray cans which you spray plants with.  I don't cover the machine over at all, let the air circulate!
                                                                   
                                                                                                   Jack.


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User avatar
Posted: 10/3/2019 10:58:00 AM
   

RE:Winterising

I forgot to mention that another aspect to winterising my Massey equipment is that I spray the wood on my barn equipment for wood worm.  The wood used on these old machines seems to be particularly prone to wood worm infestation and was often in it when I imported these old small machines such as choppers, mills and pulpers from N America.  Must be the specie of wood used???  No matter how much you treat it one has to be vigilant for a reappearence of the little devils.  

John


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User avatar
Posted: 10/5/2019 7:25:54 AM
   

RE:Winterising

Like Jack, I too put antifreeze in both of my tractors because as he mentioned, it has a anti-corrosive agent in it and I dont have to worry about draining the water when it gets cold. I use Prestone coolant and it also protects up to -40 degrees, (I hope it never gets that cold here). I'll squirt a little bit of grease in all the zerks, make sure all the fluids are up to where they should be and put a little bit of Sta-Bil in the gas tank to keep the gas from going stale over the winter.


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User avatar
Posted: 10/5/2019 8:10:58 AM
   

RE:Winterising

Dakota,

I haven't heard of Sta-Bil.  Not sure if we have such stuff over here.  Some tractor men do complain of petrol "going off" over winter but luckily I don't seem to have such a problem. 

However when I have bought old tractors from N America which have been stood for years they often had horrible smelling gungy old petrol in them which blocked up the carburettor etc.  These took a lot of cleaning out.  I find that today's petrol is very clean and my lawn mower starts first pull after the winter.  However I do suspect that supermarket (hence cheaper) petrols with more of these plant based petrols are more of a problem for "going off".  My local garage says people who use them in their cars have more "petrol" problems.

John


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User avatar
Posted: 10/5/2019 11:38:50 AM
   

RE:Winterising

Interesting, thought that stuff was well known. It does help keep the gas from going stale, dont need to put much in the tank. I know when I bought my 55 I did notice what gas was left in it (wasnt no more than a couple gallons) had gone stale. But did manage to get it all burnt off and aftet that I make sure I put Sta-Bil in both of my tractors when I know theyre going to be sitting a while. Yes I too have heard of people that use Bio fuel (as its called here in the states) do have problems like you mentioned. I personally dont like bio fuel and try to avoid it. Unfortunately there is a little bit in all octane gas ratings so I cant really get away from it.


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User avatar
Posted: 10/5/2019 4:40:49 PM
   

RE:Winterising

   My tractors are kept inside an enclosed metal pole shed with cement floor  (not heated) and try to start them up a time or two during winter and have the sheet metal ( hoods and fenders) covered with a cloth (old bed sheet) just to help keep dust off!!  Make sure the tires are aired up!!!  I believe keeping antifreeze in helps minimize rusting, especially when it comes to frost plugs and helps to keep water pump seals from drying out as a lot of the old seals were  not neoprene but rawhide, I use sta-built, usually drain my carburetors of gas  by removing bowl drain or (usually) just running the engine till it.stops, my tractors all have gas shut offs and I always shut fuel of when not in use!!!  


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User avatar
Posted: 10/6/2019 10:42:59 AM
   

RE:Winterising

In the 1950s - when I was a lad!- the authorities put a motorway through our farm.  The main contractors I remember well - A.E.Farr - they did all the heavy earth moving with what must have been the Caterpillar D6 or D8 bulldozers of the day.  The job went on for two years or so and I remember that with the onset of winter they would drain the water out of the cooling systems and fill up with pure diesel.  A coolant and antifreeze all in one.  I wonder does anyone do this now?

John


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User avatar
Posted: 10/6/2019 11:56:35 AM
   

RE:Winterising

Over here in the winter time guys put an anti-gel additive in their diesel equipment to keep the fuel from gelling up. Hard to run equipment when the filters are gelled up!


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User avatar
Posted: 10/7/2019 3:52:07 AM
   

RE:Winterising

Dakota and anyone interested.
 
Over here fuel suppliers automaticaly put anti gelling ( or waxing as it's called here) additive in their diesel deliveries from October through winter. As for petrol all my tractors are are duel fuel ie. petrol/kerosene so  it's no problem either draining the small petrol tank by syphon or burning it, otherwise it attacks cork gaskets and loses it's octane rating if left for more than a couple of months. Super petrol is better in this respect. Kerosene seems unaffected by all of this.

                                                                        Jack.


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